Mileage Records

Individual Mileage records from our clients

We love a bit of competition, so we thought why don’t we track;

  • Highest mileage in a month by a single truck.
  • Highest total mileage over a campaign by a truck.
  • The campaign with the highest mileage.

These will be continually updated each month to showcase our campaigns, clients and our loverly hauliers.

The results are below, with a First, Second and Third place and included past and present campaigns.

Highest Mileage Recorded In A Month recorded in a single month

This highlights our campaigns that go the distance. This can over historical campaign data and our most recent results. Only the highest result from a campaign can be included.

First Place

Marjon University: Trailer 1 in their campaign covered a record 5294 miles in a single month. Recorded December 2016.

Second Place

Canna: A campaign launched soon after we appeared on Dragons Den.  This campaign recorded an admirable 5140 miles in its second month! July 2018.

Third Place

The University of Derby – This Is Our Classroom: The second campaign for The University of Derby recorded a cool 4021 miles in October 2017.

Highest Total Campaign Mileage By A Single Truck.

This favours longer campaigns as theirs a longer time period to accumulate mileage, a chance for some of our first customers to show us how far they can go and to showcase our smallest campaigns that really go the distance. As always a campaign can only record one spot.

First Place

Marjon University: Trailer 1 in their campaign covered a record total mileage of  57,878 miles during their campaign. Equivalent to going around the world just over 2 times.

Second Place

The University of Derby – #DerbyUniLorries: The original truck advertising campaigns for The University of Derby recorded a total of 42,800 miles in 12 months.

Third Place

The University of Derby – This Is Our Classroom: The second campaign for the University of Derby recorded a total of 25,960 miles in 8 months.

Highest Total Campaign Mileage

How far can you go? The total campaign mileage for an advertiser as recorded by their whole fleet on the road. As always a campaign can only record one spot.

First Place

Marjon University: Trailer 1 in their campaign covered a record total mileage of  57,878 miles during their campaign. Equivalent to going around the world just over 2 times.

Second Place

The University of Derby – #DerbyUniLorries Campaign: The original campaign for The University of Derby recorded a total mileage of 42,800 miles.

Third Place

The University of Derby – This is our classroom: The second of the truck advertising campaigns launched by The University of Derby clocked up 25,940 miles. That’s around the world once.

Summer and our roads

Is the Summer Season bad for our roads?

Looking towards warmer weather it made us think is Summer as bad for our roads as Winter?

Well, we found, the answer depends on the material used to lay the roads. There are several types, some deal well with colder weather and others prefer warmer temperatures.

In the Uk, we have a climate that fluctuates, it can be freezing one week and then a barmy heat wave the next. Which is not good for the guys with the responsibility of deciding which materials to use, and global warming just isn’t helping! We almost need a road for Summer and a road for Winter.

Summer can melt our roads, last Summer some part of the UK such as Manchester saw their roads start to melt! That is the main problem caused by heat.

Heating and contracting through the day/night cycle can also cause roads to crack.

At present time the warmer weather presents less of a threat to our roads than the Wintery weather. Something to think about next time you’ve got the AC on full blast!

You know whatever the weather here in the Uk we’ll moan! Well, guess our roads are the same they don’t like it too cold or too hot!

How does the cold effect our roads?

How does the winter weather affect our roads?

With the recent winter weather, you might have noticed an increased number of potholes is this down to the cold? What else does the winter weather do to our road infrastructure?

  • Freezing and thawing cycles

Repeated freezing and thawing of the road causes the road to become more brittle and therefore more prone to cracking. The salt they use during cold weather actually adds to the damage caused as it affects the surface.

  • Expansion makes cracks worse

Water expands as it freezes to become ice by about 9 of its volume. Remeber your geography lessons about weathering? Water gets into an existing crack, freezes expanding the crack and then thaws allowing more water in.Repeat the cycle a few times and that small crack is now a huge problem.

  • Is that dam same pothole year after year!

To repair a pothole properly, your local authority should use a high-quality patch and they do work when done properly. The problem is to work properly they need time.

Local authorities need to repair a road that is open to traffic, the repair and patch happen very quickly since traffic needs to be stopped or diverted.

Often, the only time that roads can be repaired is for a few hours overnight, when they can be closed. This is a problem because the patch is not allowed to properly settle and bond to the existing road surface. This is why you see damage in the same location year after year, the patch fails.

Sometimes the only way that pothole will completely be removed is when the road is completely relaid and given time to cure.

Snow Fun

Facts about gritting the road

During the recent snowy weather, we thought we’d look into Grit. Here are some facts you might not know about the stuff they use to keep the roads ice-free.

  • Is it grit or salt?

Although it’s commonly called grit, what is used on the roads is normally rock salt, which lowers the freezing point of moisture on the road surface, to stop ice forming. It can also melt existing snow and ice although this can take a while.

  • There’s a science to gritting!

You may think just stick it down but there are actually sensors local authorities use to decide when to send out the gritters. These sensors measure road temperature, and air temperature, rain, dew and salt levels. GPS mapping is used to predict areas to focus gritting on.

Ideally, grit needs to be laid onto an already wet road so it sticks otherwise passing traffic blows it off thanks to the air they displace.

  • Where does it come from?

Surprisingly it’s British. And no it’s not from the sea. It’s actually mined, there are 3 mines across the UK; Cheshire, Teesside or County Antrim (Northen Ireland).

It transported by rail or road to your local authorities depot.

Did you know the vast caverns left over from mining are the ideal place for storing archive documents? With low humidity, no water and no UV light.

  • Once and it’s done?

Surely you grit once and it’s done, right? Unfortunately not, road salt need’s to be constantly applied otherwise the salt gets diluted by the falling snow or rain and this raises the freezing temperature. The constant application of grit keeps the dilution of the salt at an ideal level.

  • Gritting priority.
You know local authorities don’t grit every street, what priority are roads gritted?
As you might have guessed, it’s the critical road network, Motorways and A roads as well as those used by public transport.
Links to hospitals and emergency services are also a priority.
Once the main network is gritted, roads to schools and old people’s homes are next.
  • It has limits

Even salt has its breaking, or rather freezing point, which is around minus 8-10 degrees, depending on the dilution of the solution. In these temperatures, roads will still ice over regardless of whether or not they’ve been gritted.

Did we miss any? let us know!

Any Questions?
contact us